Dear Jane,

How much do you think you could sell your house for if it were put on the market today? How long would it take to sell?

You probably ask yourself these questions from time to time, even if you’re not currently thinking of making a move.

Why not find the answers?

It’s easy. Just give me a call. I’d be happy to drop by for a quick visit so that I can help you understand the market value of your house. Based on my experience and current market statistics, I can provide you with a clear picture of what to expect should you decide to sell.

Of course, there’s no cost or obligation. This is just one of the many ways I help clients enjoy their homes and understand the value of their investments.

On another note, please find below some interesting articles and helpful advice for the home buyer or seller. I hope you enjoy reading them.

Sincerely,

Julie Thomas
Your Personal Realtor...For Life!

 

Assessing a Property's Long-Term Potential
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You see a home on the market that you like. Should you buy it? Before you make an offer, it’s a good idea to get a sense of the property’s long-term potential. After all, a property is not just a potential home, it’s also an important investment.

Here are some things to look for when viewing homes on the market:

Is the area’s average income increasing? The more affluent a neighborhood becomes, the higher the property values.

Are employment opportunities growing nearby? If jobs are leaving the area, housing prices will likely decline.

Are there any nearby housing or community developments that will enhance the quality of life in the area? If a park with a quiet walking trail, or a prestigious golf course, is being built nearby, the value of the neighborhood will increase.

Is the crime rate on the rise or decline? This can have a significant impact on future property values.

Are there public transit lines located nearby? Studies show that housing prices increase in areas where public transit is close and convenient.

Is the property located in a neighborhood dominated by higher priced homes?

Does the property have features that will always be valued by home buyers, such as a large kitchen or spacious backyard.

Are there short-term negatives about the area that will eventually disappear, such as loud construction projects? Once those negatives are gone, house prices will often jump.

Need help finding the right home for you? Call today.

 

It's the Little Things That Boost Curb Appeal
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"Curb appeal". You've probably heard that term used before. It refers to how valuable and enticing your house looks from the outside, typically from the perspective of a potential buyer “standing on the curb”.

Many people focus on preparing the inside of their house for sale, and neglect preparing the outside.This is a mistake. Studies confirm that curb appeal has a huge influence over how quickly your house will sell, and for how much.

How do you improve curb appeal?

You don’t need to do a major landscaping renovation! In fact, small improvements often make the biggest difference… improvements you can easily do over a weekend.

Here are some suggestions:

  • Clean the outside of front windows. Make them sparkle!
  • Remove grass,weeds and other unwanted growth between driveway and walkway stones.
  • Prune shrubs and trim trees.
  • Re-sod bare spots on the lawn.
  • Edge the lawn. (A simple task that can have a dramatic visual impact.)
  • Water the flowerbed. (Flowers look brighter and more healthy within one hour of watering.)
  • Sweep the walkway and driveway. Rake the leaves.
  • Remove signs such as “Beware of dog” and “No solicitations”.
  • Check the welcome mat. If it’s worn or dirty, replace it.

Also, consider buying some attractive potted flowers to put near the entranceway. They are worth the investment.

As you can see, it doesn't take much to boost the curb appeal of your house. Just a little work and a few added details will make a big difference.

Need more ideas for increasing the “sales appeal” of your house? Call today.

 

5 Questions to Ask Before You Hire a Home Inspector
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Hiring the right home inspector is important. After all, you want the inspection to leave no stone unturned when determining the condition of the house you are considering purchasing.

Unfortunately, the professionalism and range of services vary widely in the home inspection industry. So it pays to ask the right questions before you choose. Here are a few suggestions:


“What does your inspection cover?”


A home inspector should be able to present you with a detailed list of what is covered in the inspection. Don’t settle for a vague verbal promise like, "We check everything top to bottom." Get it in writing.

In addition, you should get an assurance that the inspection complies with all Local and State or Provincial regulations.


“What are your qualifications?”


As with most professions, experience counts.You want to check how long the inspector has been in the business, and how many homes like yours he has inspected.

Also ask about his credentials.What professional training programs has he completed? Does he belong to a recognized home inspection association?


“Do you also offer to do home repairs or renovations?”


If he does, it’s a conflict of interest.You want an inspector to give you an unbiased report as to the condition of the house, without any expectation of getting some contracting work on the side.


“How long will the inspection take?”


You'll want to find out if the inspector takes his time and does a thorough job, or rushes things so he can get as many homes done in a day as possible. On average, a typical single family home should take two to three hours to inspect properly.


“May I contact some references?”


Ask for references from people in the neighborhood you are considering. Then, make sure you call them.

 

notable, quotable... quotes!

 

“If we keep doing what we’re doing,
we’re going to keep getting what we’re getting.”


Stephen R. Covey

 

“I never worry about action, but only about inaction.”

Winston Churchill

 

“A man who believes he can do it is probably right,
and so is the man who believes he can’t.”


Laurence J. Peter